Event archive

Dr Els C.M. van Rooij | The mental health crisis in doctoral education

Guest Lecture

Prof. Soyoung Q Park | Motives and modulators of human decision making

Guest Lecture
What drives us to trust someone we just met? Did we eat spaghetti for lunch because we saw our colleague eat spaghetti? Can we become happier when we are nicer to our neighbors? How does the content of our breakfast have anything to do with our social interactions throughout the day? Research from different disciplines such as economics, psychology and neuroscience have attempted to investigate the motives and modulators of human decision making. Our decisions can be flexibly modulated by the different experiences we have in our daily lives. These modulations can occur through our social networks, through the impact of our own behavior on the social environment, but also simply by the food we have eaten. Here, I will present a series of recent studies from my lab in which we shed light on the psychological, neural and metabolic motives and modulators of human decision making. [more]

Prof. Karen Emmorey | Neural effects (and non-effects) of iconicity in sign language

Guest Lecture

Nace Mikus | Computational phenotyping of dopaminergic manipulations

Guest Lecture
The dopaminergic circuits lie at the core of learning and motivational processes through which we are able to form predictions about the future and take action accordingly. Studies in animals have shown that midbrain dopaminergic neurons projecting to the striatum signal events in the environment that deviate from what we expect. A prevalent model of the dopaminergic function suggests that these so-called prediction errors –propagated by the D1 dopamine receptors to cortical areas – modulate synaptic plasticity and thereby facilitate learning and initiation of action. While D2 dopamine receptors in the striatum as well as prefrontal striatal projection regulate and modulate this signal propagation. How this neurobiological model of dopaminergic activity relates to behaviour has been difficult to address. In my talk I will present several pharmacogenetic studies that map manipulations of the dopaminergic system on to various computational phenotypes. First of all, we are interested in the role of dopamine in updating beliefs in a social as well as a non-social context. And second, we explored dopamine’s involvement in model-based decision making. Specifically, how does blocking D2 transmission affect our ability to keep the regularities and knowledge about the world online as we make decisions and learn about the states of the world that are not directly observed? [more]

Prof. Kenneth Norman | Computational principles of event memory

Mind Meeting

Dr Alain Dagher | Models of neurodegeneration in Parkinson’s Disease: testing the prion hypothesis

Guest Lecture

PhD Johanna Vannesjo | Magnetic field matters in ultra-high field neuroimaging

Guest Lecture

Dr Eric Schulz | Using structure to explore efficiently

Guest Lecture

Dr Mariam Aly | How hippocampal memory shapes, and is shaped by, attention

Mind Meeting
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