Department of Neuropsychology

Search results

Journal Article (1)

  1. Journal Article
    Wolff, S.; Schlesewsky, M.; Hirotani, M.; Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, I.: The neural mechanisms of word order processing revisited: Electrophysiological evidence from Japanese. Brain and Language 107 (2), pp. 133 - 157 (2008)

Meeting Abstract (3)

  1. Meeting Abstract
    Wolff, S.; Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, I.; Schlesewsky, M.: Die Subjektspräferenz als universelles Phänomen in der Ambiguitätsverarbeitung: EKP-Evidenz aus dem Japanischen. In Experimentelle Psychologie. Beiträge zur 50. Tagung experimentell arbeitender Psychologen, p. 293. Pabst Science Publishers, Lengerich, Germany (2008)
  2. Meeting Abstract
    Wolff, S.; Schlesewsky, M.; Horie, K.; Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, I.: Understanding "missing" arguments: An electrophysiological investigation of subject drop in Japanese. In Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, Supplement, p. 113. (2008)
  3. Meeting Abstract
    Wolff, S.; Schlesewsky, M.; Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, I.: The interaction of universal and language-specific properties in the neurocognition of language comprehension: Evidence from the processing of word order permutations in Japanese. In Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, Supplement, p. 288. (2007)

Poster (2)

  1. Poster
    Wolff, S.; Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, I.; Horie, K.; Schlesewsky, M.: Understanding "missing" arguments: An electrophysiological investigation of subject drop in Japanese. 15th Annual Cognitive Neuroscience Society Meeting (CNS), San Francisco, CA, USA (2008)
  2. Poster
    Wolff, S.; Schlesewsky, M.; Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, I.: The interaction of universal and language-specific properties in the neurocognition of language comprehension: Evidence from the processing of word order permutations in Japanese. 2007 Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Neuroscience Society (CNS), New York, NY, USA (2007)

Thesis - PhD (1)

  1. Thesis - PhD
    Wolff, S.: The interplay of free word order and pro-drop in incremental sentence processing: Neurophysiological evidence from Japanese. Dissertation, 325 pp., Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig (2010)
 
loading content
Go to Editor View